Type your paragraph here.

Spiegel Grove Diver Specialty Course Instructor Outline

COURSE STANDARDS AND OVERVIEW


 

This course is designed to be an introduction to Spiegel Grove diving and to help the student diver develop the skills and knowledge necessary to conduct safe and enjoyable dives on this popular and interesting wreck off Key Largo in the Florida Keys.

 

Prerequisites

To qualify for the Spiegel Grove Diver Specialty course, an individual must:

1. Be certified as a PADI Open Water Diver or have a qualifying certification from another training agency.

2. Be 15 years of age or older.

 

Instructor Supervision

Spiegel Grove Diver courses may be conducted by a Teaching Status PADI Instructor (or PADI Instructor with a higher rating) who has been certified as a Spiegel Grove Diver Specialty Instructor.

During all open water training dives, student divers must be accompanied by a Teaching Status PADI Instructor at a maximum ratio of eight divers to one instructor (8:1).

 

Considerations for Open Water Training

The Spiegel Grove Diver course is to include two open water training dives, which may be conducted over one day. There are to be no penetration dives.

After the training dives, student divers are required to log their dives in their personal log books.

 

CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES

The certifying instructor obtains a Spiegel Grove Diver certification by submitting a completed, signed PIC to the appropriate PADI Office. The instructor who conducts the student’s final open water training session is to be the certifying instructor. The instructor certifying the student must insure that all certification requirements have been met.

 

I. Course Overview

A. The purpose of the Spiegel Grove Diver Specialty course is to familiarize divers with the skills, knowledge, planning, organization, procedures, techniques, problems, hazards and excitement of diving the Spiegel Grove. The Spiegel Grove Diver Specialty course is intended as a safe, supervised introduction to diving this wreck, with emphasis on fun and safety. The goals of Spiegel Grove Diver training are:

1. Upon completing this course, the student should be able to demonstrate practical diving knowledge of wreck diving, including potential hazards and planning procedures to make diving the Spiegel Grove fun and enjoyable.

2. Upon completing this course, the student should be able to explain the history of the Spiegel Grove, the procedures that were used for the initial planned sinking, the procedures used for turning the wreck on its side and the events leading to its eventual righting.

3. Upon completing this course, the student should be able to explain the benefits of an artificial reef and the social and legal aspects of the sinking of the Spiegel Grove.

B. The knowledge development portion of this course can be covered during pre-dive and post-dive briefings or during a classroom presentation.

 

II. Equipment

A. Student equipment:

1. All personal equipment required by the local environment including:

a. Mask, snorkel and fins

b. Exposure suit appropriate for the local diving environment and depth. Regardless of thermal protection requirements, it is recommended that all divers wear full-length abrasion and cut protection, including gloves, to minimize the possibility of cuts due to contact with a wreck.

c. Weight system

d. Regulator with submersible pressure gauge

e. Alternate air source suitable for sharing air with other divers

f. BCD with low-pressure inflator

g. Complete instrumentation, including a means to determine depth, time and direction

Depth and time monitoring may be accomplished with a dive computer, but encourage your students to wear backup gauges, too.

h. Dive tool or knife capable of cutting line, particularly monofilament and rope

i. Slate with pencil

j. Whistle or other surface signaling device.

k. Log book (PADI Adventure Log recommended)

B. Instructor equipment

a. All personal standard and specialty equipment required of students

b. First aid kit and emergency oxygen

c. Dive flags and surface floats as required by the local environment

d. Descent/down line as appropriate for local environment

e. PADI materials that may be used to teach this course.

General materials and teaching aids:

.           Giant Recreational Dive Planner — The Wheel and Table

            Log book.

            Student Record File

            PADI Wreck Diving video, diver edition

PADI Adventures in Diving Manual

            The Encyclopedia of Recreational Diving

            Recognition materials:

            PIC envelopes

            Specialty Diver wall certificates

f. Spiegel Grove Video

g. Spiegel Grove Specialty Instructor Outline

 

III. Knowledge Development Presentation

A. Introductions

1. [Introduce yourself and your assistants.]

2. [Have students introduce themselves and say why they’re interested in Spiegel Grove diving — get to know your students and encourage a relaxed atmosphere.]

a. Upon successful completion of the course, you will be awarded the Spiegel Grove Diver Specialty certification.

b. Certification means you’re qualified to:

Plan, organize, make and log recreational dives on the Spiegel Grove in conditions generally comparable to or better than those you’re trained in.

3. Administration

(Complete paperwork: including enrollment forms, Standard Safe Diving Practices Statement of Understanding, PADI Medical Statement, Liability Release and Assumption of Risk)

B. Reasons for Diving the Spiegel Grove

Learning Objectives.

After this discussion, you’ll be able to answer the following questions:

• What are four common reasons why people dive the Spiegel Grove?

1. Curiosity — This is a relatively new wreck and has received much media coverage due to the premature sinking and the eventual righting.  Also, it is unique as the largest ship sunk as an artificial reef for divers.

2. History — There is the history as a military vessel as well as all the history connected with the many problems associated with its sinking.

3. Aquatic life — Wrecks become man-made reefs that attract aquatic life. They also, most likely, reduce the total number of divers visiting the natural reefs.

4. Photography — Wrecks make dramatic backgrounds for photos of divers and wildlife, and wrecks themselves are photogenic. This makes photography on wrecks interesting and rewarding.

C.  Hazards of Diving the Spiegel Grove

Learning Objectives.

After this discussion, you’ll be able to answer the following questions:

• What are four potential hazards common to the Spiegel Grove, and how do you avoid them?

1. Sharp objects — Rusted metal objects, and rough coral encrustations pose potential injury.  You avoid these by wearing exposure suits and always wearing gloves.

2. Entanglement — Because the Spiegel Grove attracts fish, it is a popular fishing site, and you may find monofilament fishing line or even nets on it. You avoid these by watching where you go. Look up as well as around as you progress to prevent swimming under entangling objects. Carry a sharp knife with a smooth and a serrated edge to handle entanglement too difficult to untangle by hand.

3. Aquatic life — The Spiegel Grove quickly became an artificial reef that attracts aquatic life. Watch for the same creatures you would on a natural reef, such as those that can defensively sting or bite. Avoid these in the same way you would on a natural reef: watch where you put your hands, feet and knees; wear protective clothing; and don’t touch unfamiliar animals.

4.Entrapment--Without proper training, experience and equipment, penetration of the Spiegel Grove is dangerous.  Loss of direction, disorientation, possible tight passages and falling objects coupled with no direct access to the surface is why penetration is not done during this course and should not be considered without the previously listed.

D. Mapping of the Spiegel Grove

Learning Objectives.

After this discussion, you’ll be able to answer the following questions:

• What three tools can you use when mapping this wreck, and what is each used for?

 Basic wreck mapping techniques

a. Use distance estimation techniques as taught in the Adventures in Diving program underwater navigation dive — kick cycles, arm spans and timed swims.

b. Use these three tools:

1. Large slate — used for drawing the map.

2. Compass — used to determine the relative angle of the wreck and its features. Beware of possible compass deviation around steel or iron.

3. Navigational aids — (Nav-Finder, slates with grids, etc.) used with the above to precisely locate objects on a map.

Procedures and materials for mapping a portion of the Spiegel Grove will be discuat the surface should be a

IV. Spiegel Grove Training Dive One

Performance Requirements.

By the end of this dive, the student should be able to:

• Swim on the outside of the Spiegel Grove, maintaining proper buoyancy control, and identifying and avoiding potential hazards, under the direct supervision of a Teaching Status PADI Instructor

• Navigate on the Spiegel Grove so that the ascent point can be located without surfacing, with the assistance of the instructor.

• Maintain neutral buoyancy and body position so that the bottom is avoided.

On this dive, you will demonstrate basic wreck diving skills; the students practice, following your example. This is basically an underwater tour of the Spiegel Grove.

A. General open water considerations

1. Involve students in dive-planning activities.

2. Conduct a thorough briefing.

3. Assign logistical duties to staff and review emergency protocols.

4. The bottom time should never exceed the no-decompression limits on the Recreational Dive Planner or each student’s dive computer (if used). Preferably, all dives will end with a reasonable margin of extra conservatism.

5. Training Dive One and Two in the course must be conducted on the Spiegel Grove.  No other wrecks can be used to teach this course.

 

B. Briefing

1. Evaluate the conditions

2. Facilities at the dive site

3. Entry technique and location

4. Exit technique and location

5. Description of the wreck or specific area of the dive.

6. Depth ranges

7. Interesting and helpful facts about the dive site

8. Sequence of training dive —

a. Navigate Spiegel Grove, identifying and avoiding potential hazards.

b. Control buoyancy and avoid stirring bottom silt.

c. Return to ascent point

9. Emergency procedures

10. Buddy assignments

C. Predive procedures

1. Prepare personal equipment.

2. Calculate no-decompression limits.

3. Prepare 5 metre/15 foot stop air supply, if appropriate.

4. Don personal diving equipment.

5. Predive safety check

D. Proper entry for local environment

E. Descent — Standard head up (head above feet) descent to the wreck following the mooring line.

F. Training Dive One

1. Navigation: The instructor leads, using navigation techniques appropriate for the wreck. Buddy teams follow, copying the navigation technique. During this exercise, provide students with an overview of the exterior of the wreck.

2. Students control their buoyancy and remain neutrally buoyant as appropriate. Students avoid silting problems through buoyancy and fin control and watch for wreck and aquatic life hazards.

3. With students following and observing, instructor navigates on the wreck so class reaches the ascent point without surfacing.

G. Ascent — safety stop at 5 metres/15 feet

H. Post-dive procedures

1. Make exit appropriate for environment.

2. Stow equipment and exchange tanks as appropriate.

3. Calculate repetitive group at the end of the dive.

I. Debriefing

1. Comment on student performance.

2. Discuss wreck condition and features.

3. Discuss possible structure and aquatic life hazards observed on the wreck.

4. Discuss navigation of the wreck.

5. Log dive. (Instructor signs log.)

 

V. Spiegel Grove Training Dive Two

Performance Requirements.

By the end of this dive, the student should be able to:

• Swim along the outside of the Spiegel Grove, in a buddy team, identifying and avoiding potential hazards.

• With a buddy, map the Spiegel Grove (or portion of it), determining approximate size and marking points of interest.

• Navigate on the wreck, returning to the ascent point without surfacing.

A. Briefing

1. Evaluate the conditions

2. Facilities at the dive site

3. Entry technique and location

4. Exit technique and location

5. Description of the wreck

6. Depth ranges

7. Interesting and helpful facts about the dive site

8. Sequence of training dive —

a. Explore Spiegel Grove

b. Map wreck (or portion of wreck depending on its size)

c. Return to ascent point without surfacing

9. Emergency procedures

10. Buddy assignments

B. Predive procedures

1. Prepare personal equipment.

2. Calculate no-decompression limits.

3. Prepare 5 metre/15 foot stop air supply, if appropriate.

4. Don personal diving equipment.

5. Predive safety check

D. Proper entry for local environment

E. Descent — Standard head up descent to the wreck following the mooring line.

F. Training Dive Two

1. Students explore the wreck site, using navigation techniques appropriate for the site.

2. Mapping: Each buddy team maps the wreck (or a portion of the wreck), noting points of interest and potential hazards.

G. Ascent — safety stop at 5 metres/15 feet.

H. Post-dive procedures.

1. Make exit appropriate for environment.

2. Stow equipment and exchange tanks as appropriate.

3. Calculate repetitive group at the end of the dive.

I. Debriefing

1. Comment on student performance.

2. Review wreck maps.

4. Log dive. (Instructor signs log.)

VI. Graduation Ceremony

Have a final class meeting as appropriate. Present certification credentials as part of the event.​
Type your paragraph here.